Live Audio Description for “Gone With The Wind”, July 15th

I will be providing live audio description for “Gone With The Wind”, part of the CAPA Summer Movie Series this coming Sunday, July 15th at the Ohio Theatre.

Gone With The Wind (1939)
Sunday, July 15, 2018 @ 2:00 PM

Fiddle-dee-dee! Winner of eight Oscar Awards including Best Picture, Margaret Mitchell’s Civil War masterpiece set the standard for epic film-making. This Library of Congress treasure featuring the love/hate relationship of Rhett and Scarlett was also ranked as the #6 Greatest Movie of All Time by the American Film Institute.

The program is as follows:
1:00 PM  Doors open
1:15 PM  Program notes (more detailed descriptions of the characters, costumes and sets as well as information from the printed program)
1:30 PM  Clark Wilson’s performance on the “Mighty Morton” organ begins
2:00 PM  Movie begins

Here is a description of Tara, the O’Hara family home:

The O’Hara family home at Tara is a large whitewashed brick house with dark green shutters, framed by two large trees with wide trunks and gnarled branches that support a thick canopy of green leaves. It has a wide front porch with tall white columns. Margaret Mitchell describes it as “a clumsy sprawling building that crowned the rise of ground overlooking the green incline of pasture land running down to the river …”

The house is asymmetrical. The main portion of the house is two stories high. It has three tall windows on the first floor. Inside the house, the windows would reach from the floor to the ceiling. Two of the windows are to the left and one is to right of the front door. The windows are as tall as the arched transom window above the front door. There are four shorter windows on the second floor. These windows are half the height of the windows that open onto the porch.

Off-center and to the left of a single tall window on the porch is the front door. It is paneled and painted white. The front door is flanked by narrow glass sidelights. Slender wooden columns are on either side of the sidelights. Resting atop the four wooden columns is a large transom window. It spans the combined width of the sidelights and the front door. The window is flat on the bottom and curved on top. The glass is divided into V-shaped sections by thin wood bars or muntins that radiate from the center of the bottom of the window. An arched bar echoes the outside top arch midway of the height of the window.

Five red brick steps lead up to the two-story porch that spans the main part of the house. The porch has four white square brick columns. Its roof slopes downward from the shallowly pitched gabled roof of the house.

A smaller two-story wing is set back slightly on the left. It has a single shuttered window on each story that match the ones on the main portion of the house. Another one story wing sits to the left of that, with just its roofline visible to us as Scarlett runs down the drive.

There are two tall white chimneys rise above the roofline of the house, one on either gable end of the main part of the house.  Four small windows are on either side of the chimney visible right side of the house.  Two are on the first floor and two are on the second. The chimney juts out from the side of the house.  Its outline indicates the large fireplace on the first floor and slightly narrower one on the second floor. At the top of the second story windows, the chimney angles inward and continues straight upward, like an upside down Y.

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Clouds, As Seen From the Window of the Plane (or Smoke and Mirrors)

This is for my friend who likes a little poetry with his description:

As I look out the window of the plane, I see an array of white clouds below. Large banks of clouds rest in mounding heaps. They occupy the same horizontal plane in space as though they were arranged on a tabletop of clear glass.

At the edges of the large mounds of clouds are smaller clusters followed by yet smaller clumps until eventually there are tiny individual clouds around the edges. The landscape below is clearly visible between the banks of clouds.

The surfaces of the mounds are lumpy as though they are built up of many balls of cotton. The mounds look like small mountains suspended in the air. They look substantial, like the hillocks of snow at the edges of a shoveled sidewalk. The cloud mountains slope downwards and have diffused edges of smaller clumps which resemble several loose cotton balls stuck together. The small clumps give way to what look like single cotton balls where the heaps of fluffy white clouds peter out along the edges. These smallest bits have raggedy edges as though they have been gently teased apart.

The landscape far below the clouds is miniaturized. Tracts of fields and wooded areas appear as an assortment of jigsaw pieces in multiple shades of green ranging from the yellow green of chartreuse to the blue greens of forest green and several shades in between. Fields where the rows are just beginning to sprout are reddish brown like cocoa powder and have thin straight lines of light green. Fields that are a bit more filled in have a breath of green over the red brown of the dirt. Roads appear as cream colored threads outlining some of the puzzle pieces. Irregular lines of dark green outline others, where trees or shrubs have either been planted or not cleared. Buildings are dispersed singly and in groups as bright specks along the roads and more occasionally in the fields or amongst the trees.

Here and there a shiny ribbon of river snakes its way through the scene below, a dull silver accent below the clouds.

As my plane makes its final approach for landing and descends through the clouds, I see that they are just areas of concentrated fog and that the rivers are moving and muddy.

Audio Described Touch Tour at Ohio Craft Museum

We have added an additional tour on June 19th at 6:30 PM. There is plenty of space available for that tour at this time. Reservations are required for this free event.

The Ohio Craft Museum will offer an audio-described touch tour of The Best of 2018 exhibition. This juried collection features 76 contemporary fine craft works by 51 artists working in ceramics, wood, metal, fiber, glass and more.

Designed for visitors with visual impairments and their companions, the tour offers the ability to experience the richness and diversity of the works on display. The guide, Jane Ehrenfeld, will combine verbal descriptions of the works with the tactile experience of touching samples of materials, facsimiles or the artworks themselves.

The hour-long tour will take place Tuesday, June 19, at 6:30 pm . Space is limited for this free program; save your space by registering online at https://bit.ly/2FHGQb6, or by calling the museum at (614) 486-4402 or email info@ohiocraft.org.

The Ohio Craft Museum is located at 1665 West Fifth Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43212. Hours: Monday–Friday, 10 a.m.–5 p.m.; Saturday–Sunday, 1–4 p.m. Admission and parking are free. For more information, call (614) 486-4402, or see our website at www.ohiocraft.org.

Happy Birthday, Louis Braille!

On this day two hundred and eight years ago Louis Braille, the man responsible for devising the system that bears his name of six dots to a cell for each letter of the alphabet, was born in a small village in France. But did you know that he was only a teenager when he did this groundbreaking work? The link below is to a half hour audio described and captioned docudrama video about Louis Braille:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OFyY7u95nxw

When I Grow Up

This past winter, I had the opportunity to design a touch tour and write verbal descriptions for an exhibit featuring the work of Ohio artist James Mellick.  Here is one of his more lighthearted dog sculptures.

Wooden sculpture of a little dog with very tall skinny legs.
When I Grow Up                     James Mellick jamesmellick.com

When I Grow Up, 2007

 Maple

 This abstract sculpture of a very small dog on very tall legs stands about 4’ high. The body looks like a breadbox on stilts. The four legs rise up as four separate elements and are joined by a rectangular mid-section of two pieces with a wide gap running horizontally along its side. The legs are slender and elongated with knees and elbows about a third of the way up from the floor. The muscles, tendons and joints in the legs are subtly indicated by the gentle swelling of the stick-like limbs that then flare out at the thighs and shoulders. They appear to have been stretched as if they were elastic. The four pad-like paws with their carved front toes standing squarely on the ground seem large given the thinness of the legs.  Behind each of the front legs, the dewclaws are represented by teardrop form attached at to the limb at its upper tapered neck and the globule hanging in high relief.

Two large bat-like ears resembling large pasta shells growing up from the back edges of the head mounted at the front end of the boxy body. The brow sits well below the ears. The muzzle tapers toward the blunt rectangular nose. The mouth is a narrow downward slit toward the bottom of the muzzle.

Rear view of a wooden sculpture of a very small dog on very tall skinny legs.
When I Grow Up  (rear view)  James  Mellick

At the other end, a long thin tail curls down and around the rump, between the hind legs, where it then arcs downward beneath the middle of the torso.

The shapes are very simplified and there is minimal detail. The surface is smooth and polished with a soft sheen.

 

A Piece Of History

Close up color photograph of a tall narrow vase on display in a gallery.
Wood-fired stoneware vase by Dick Cooter of Cooter Pottery.

 

This tall narrow vase stands 16” high and is 5” wide.  The body or lower portion is a little over half the height of the vase.  At the shoulder of the vase, just below the slightly tapered base of the neck, is a strip of clay that joins the neck to the cylindrical body.  It protrudes from the body like an uneven collar.  The bottom of this strip has a rough edge that appears to have been torn.   lug or knob has been pulled from this strip on either side. They stick out like little fingertips.  The tops of these lugs have a small depression as if made by a thumb pressing down while the clay was wet.  Two more lugs with holes in them are also on either side near the top of the neck, below the rim of the mouth. Uneven in size, the one on the right is a little bit longer than the one on the left.  They stick out like two small rectangular ears.

This vase is like a recording.  The depressions on the tops of the lugs at the shoulders, the rings banding the body and the neck, the splitting and cracking where the upper lugs and shoulder collar are attached, and the unevenness of the walls – they way they bow in and bulge outward – are all a record of the artist’s hands and the nature of clay.  The color of the vase is smoky and streaky with flares of lustrous coppery reds, greys and blacks as well as the surface textures that range from glossy to matte, smooth to rough are all reflective of the wood-firing process.

This vase is part of the audio described touch tour for the exhibit “For the Table” at the Ohio Crafts Museum.

 

Ginkgo Candelabra Set

IMG_5262 2
Ginkgo Candelabra Set by Matthew and Karine Maynard of Maynard Studios, Inc.

Above is a photograph of one of the pieces included in the audio described touch tours I recently did at the Ohio Crafts Museum for the Best of 2017 exhibit last month.  This was one of the pieces we had permission to touch.  The complete description, as given in the tour, is below:

Ginkgo Candelabra Set

Hand forged; mild steel land silicon bronze with walnut support base

Karine & Matthew Maynard

Lawrenceburg, KY

The artist’s words:

The Ginkgo tree has survived since the time of the dinosaurs and its leaves are beautiful in their grace and shape. This piece celebrates light and time by using the Ginkgo as a design motif and as a symbol of life.

This set consists of three pieces: a long, horizontal candelabrum that measures almost three feet wide and 14” high and two tall symmetrical candelabra that measure 12.5” wide and 40” high. All three pieces are 5.5” deep.

The low wide candelabrum sits on the front of the open display stand and is flanked by the two tall candelabra immediately behind. All three of the pieces consist of sinuous ribbons and tendrils of dull grey metal that swirl and curl around a more static form. On the long low piece, the form around which the tendrils travel is a thick arching vine or branch that rises from the far left and touches down several inches short of the far right edge where it curves gently upwards. Growing from the long the shoots that stem from the main arching vine are gold fan-shaped ginkgo leaves. They have a central vein and lightly scalloped arched tops. Their stems echo the left to right flow of the viny growth. Five small grey candle cups rest on five golden drip pans, like handle-less teacups on saucers, at varying heights along the length of the candelabrum.

The two tall candelabra are mirror images of each other so what is on the right side of one will be on the left side of the other. They each consist of a single straight rod-like element that is 40” high, the last 8” of which rise above a tangle of swirling tendrils. These tall forms begin as flattened triangular forms emerging from the base of the candelabrum, less than 1/2” thick. As they rise, the apex of the triangle is stretched upwards and the shape grows thinner and rounder until it becomes a slender rod topped by a candle cup and drip pan. Two more candle cups and drip pans perch on tendrils emerging from the twining growth: one to the outside of the tall rod several inches above the base and the other to the inside of that central rod, about halfway to the top. A few ginkgo leaves sprout from a curved shoot to the inside of the lowest candle cup. As in the low horizontal candelabrum, the main components are dark grey with antique gold accents in the ginkgo leaves and saucer.

All three pieces rest upon low walnut bases. The warm tones of the wood echo the warm notes of the gold accents. The gold saucers and leaves have a grayish patina so that the contrast between the two metals is muted. The metal itself has a hammered texture, tangible evidence of the artists’ tools.